Moissac, Tarn et Garonne, Tuesday 31st October 2017

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Pretty Moissac and canal in the morning mist

For once, we have stuck to our plans and have come back to Moissac for a spot of fishing, arriving last Thursday.  Since then, apart from the fishing, we have been visiting all the interesting sites this lovely little old town has to offer and, being as it is one of the major pilgrimage stops on the Way to Santiago de Compostela, it boasts an awe-inspiring Abbey of St Peter’s, with a jaw-dropping Portal and Tympanum with magnificent Romanesque sculptures and stone carvings, unsurprisingly considered to be a masterpiece of this artistic period and is part of UNESCO World Heritage.  Sadly, the master craftsman of this superb work of art has remained anonymous.

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The magnificent Portal and tympanum stone carvings at St Peter’s Abbey in Moissac depicting St John’s vision of the Apocalypse, part of UNESCO World Heritage

 

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St Peter holding the keys to Heaven

But the beautiful and fine works of art don’t stop at the Portal, as inside it is equally fascinating and we took some time studying the various polychrome wood carvings, paintings, Romanesque and Gothic architecture and, oldest and most mysterious of all, a 4th century sarcophagus beneath the majestic organ.  This is certainly a site not to be missed and, indeed, we are going back this afternoon to visit its Cloister, the oldest in the world, completed in 1100, and also part of the UNESCO World Heritage.

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15th century polychrome wood carving of La Pieta
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Escape to Egypt polychrome wood carving
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Enigmatic 4th century sarcophagus

We also went on a hike up the hill to the Viewpoint of the Virgin to be rewarded by a stunning view of the town, river, canal and bridges below and we were lucky enough to find a beautiful blue sky and clear views all round.

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Moissac from Viewpoint of the Virgin
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Napoleon Bridge, built between 1812 and 1829

Another marvel of this amazing town is the Pont Canal du Cacor, a 365 metre long bridge built in 1867 and one of the biggest in France, which allows boats to cross over the river Tarn following the lateral canal of the river Garonne, and this magnificent bridge is only a few hundred metres from this motorhome aire, a mere 10-minute walk.

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Medieval houses by St Peter’s Abbey

Before returning to Moissac from Aire-sur-l’Adour, we stopped for two days at the pretty free aire in Condom, where we enjoyed lovely long walks in the nearby grounds surrounding the mill, campsite and water park, as well as a visit to the town itself, where we found an original sculpture of Dartagnan and Three Musketeers right outside the Cathedral.  We also indulged on a delicious bottle of the local Armagnac, which we intend to enjoy during the winter months.

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The Mill at Condom

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Dartagnan and the Three Musketeers at Condom

We might stay here a few days longer, as Moissac has everything we need, including a wonderful street market on Saturdays and Sundays and a launderette outside the local Casino supermarket, just a short walk away and which I have already taken advantage of.

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15th century house at Moissac
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Fishing on the river Tarn, Moissac

 


12 thoughts on “Moissac, Tarn et Garonne, Tuesday 31st October 2017

  1. We play cards and I am about to do some crochet. I am also reading The Rainmaker by John Grisham: he never disappoints. I have read about 8 of his books and they are all enthralling. In the evenings, we are watching the second season of House of Cards: brilliant!
    Peter says that it is a bit more complicated than that. He hasn’t had much luck this time. 😦

    Liked by 1 person

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